The King of Gems

Investing in Burma rubies is also a wise decision. As big size, natural, unheated and untreated, high quality Burmese rubies are exceptionally rare and exorbitantly expensive. These mesmerizings gems have the unique quality of being able to attract very very high prices at auction, even with significant inclusions.

In fact, rubies are more valuable than colorless diamonds when it comes to price per carat, because fine quality rubies never come in large sizes. High-quality rubies that weigh over 5 carats can sell for much more than a similar-sized diamond.

The most sought-after rubies come from Burma. The investment value of this natural gem is so rare, only those who understands its beauty, origin and history can truly appreciate it as a true treasure. 

What follows is a listing of auction price records for ruby in the past two decades.

Other large Burma rubies sold at auction: 

• Christies 2015: The 15.04 Crimson Flame Ruby sold for $18.3 million or $1,216,755 per carat;

• Sotheby's 2015: The 25.59 Sunrise sold for almost $1.2 million per carat. This gem has eye-visible inclusions;

• Sotheby's 2014. Graff bought the gem red, clean 8.62 for over $8.5 million or $997,000 per carat;

• Sotheby's 2014: A 10.10 Burma ruby sold for over $8.2 million or $834,000 per carat with an SSEF grading report;

• Sotheby's 2014: A 23.66 Burmese ruby with a SSEF grading report (In trade it would be called a pink sapphire, sold for over $6 million or $257,000 per carat. Quite a high price for a pink stone;

• Christie's 2013: The 13.21 Regal Ruby sold for over $5.9 million for $446,000 per carat;

• Christie's 2013: A 8.39 Burma ruby with an AGL report sold for $3.9 million or $437,000 per carat;

• Christie's 2012: Elizabeth Taylor's 8.24 Burma ruby fetched $4.2 million or over $512,000 per carat;

• Christie's 2012: The Etcetera 6.04 sold for $3.3 million or $551,000 per carat;

• Sotheby's 2011: A 30.20 Burmese ruby with Gübelin paper sold for over $4.2 million or $141,000 per carat;

• Christie's 2010: An old 9.20 Burmese ruby sold for $3.3 million or $358,000 per carat;

• Sotheby's 2010: An 8.66 cushion Burmese ruby sold for $2,098,500 or $242,000 per carat;

• Christie's 09: A 7.03 Burmese ruby sold for $1.13 million or $160,000 per carat;

• Christie's 2007: A 12.43 carat cushion Burma ruby sold for $2 million or $160,000 per carat;

• Christie's 2006: Graff bought the 9.25 Burma ruby for $2.42 million or $ 261,000 per carat;

• Christie's 2006: Graff paid $3.62 million or $420,000 per carat for an 8.62 Burma ruby;

• Christie's 2005: An Asian private pays $2.2 million or $274,000 per carat for an 8.01 Burma ruby.

So, classic ruby investments are good for solid financial health and huge profit margins.

“Buying a Mogok stone is like buying a painting from a famous artist,” said Richard Hughes, author of “Ruby & Sapphire: A Collector’s Guide.”